plessy v. fergerson

plessy v. fergerson - violate the Fourteenth Amendment? No...

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-1Courtney Smith Randy DeJesus Katie Plessy v. Fergerson Facts: Louisiana passed a law that required separate railway cars for blacks and whites. In Plessy who was seven-eighths white took a seat in a "whites only" car of a Louisiana train that was going from New Orleans to Covington, LA. He refused to move to the car reserved for blacks and was arrested. This case later turned into the platform of Brown v. Board of Education. Issues: Can states have separate but equal accommodations? Yes. Does this
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Unformatted text preview: violate the Fourteenth Amendment? No Reasoning: It would violate only if the code did not allow the blacks to take trains. States can separate facilities to keep races segregated. But in fairness, it is unconstitutional. Holding: 7 votes for Fergerson, 1 against. The decision was made on the separate-but-equal law, that separate accommodations for blacks and whites pleased the Fourteenth Amendment as long as they were equal....
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This note was uploaded on 04/19/2011 for the course PSCI 4200 taught by Professor Kimmyking during the Fall '10 term at North Texas.

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plessy v. fergerson - violate the Fourteenth Amendment? No...

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