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week 2 part 2 - Classification Assessment Diagnosis...

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3/28/11 1 Classification, Assessment, Diagnosis & Treatment Category – _______ grouping Dimension – behavior that is continuous and can occur in varying ______ • Classification – Explicit – Discriminable – _____ – gives us more information than we had before the classification was applied – Reliable • _________ • Test-retest Classification 1. Clinical Description 2. Prognosis 3. Treatment Planning & Evaluation Diagnosis 3 Purposes of Diagnosis
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3/28/11 2 1. Clinical Description Clinical Description - summary – Intensity, frequency, severity – Age of onset and _________ – Symptoms • Diagnosis – Taxonomic diagnosis - formal assignment of cases drawn from a system of classification – ___________ analysis - diagnosis as a process of gathering information, to understand the individual’s problem Diagnosis: 3 Purposes 2. Prognosis Prognosis - formulation of ________ concerning future behavior under specified conditions Diagnosis: 3 Purposes 3. Treatment Planning & Evaluation Plan treatment Evaluate effectiveness Diagnosis: 3 Purposes
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3/28/11 3 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV Categorical approach to diagnosis – Differences in ____ rather than degree Revision process going on right now DSM DSM-IV: Categories for Children Disorders usually first diagnosed in infancy, childhood, and adolescence Disorders that are the same as adults – Mood - only 1 year for children – ______ - children don’t have insight into phobias – Schizophrenia Diagnosis DSM-IV: Categories for Children Mental Retardation Learning Disorders Pervasive Developmental Disorders (e.g., Autism) Feeding and Eating Disorders of Infancy or Early Childhood Attention-Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders (i.e., Conduct Disorder and ODD) Elimination disorder (i.e., enuresis and encopresis) Diagnosis
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3/28/11 4 DSM-IV: Axes Axis I: Clinical Syndromes Axis II: Mental Retardation & Personality Disorders Axis III: General Medical Conditions Axis IV: Psychosocial Stressors Axis V: Global Assessment of Functioning Diagnosis DSM-IV: Axis 5 Children’s Global Assessment Scale 100-91 Superior functioning in all areas (at home, at school and with peers); involved in a wide range of activities and has many interests (e.g., has hobbies or participates in extracurricular activities or belongs to an organized group such as Scouts, etc.); likeable, confident; ‘everyday’ worries never get out of hand; doing well in school; no symptoms. 90-81 Good functioning in all areas ; secure in family, school, and with peers; there may be transient difficulties and _______ worries that occasionally get out of hand (e.g., mild anxiety associated with an important exam, occasional ‘blowups’ with siblings, parents or peers). 80-71 No more than ______ impairments in functioning at home, at school, or with peers; some disturbance of behavior or emotional distress may be present in response to life stresses (e.g., parental separations, deaths, birth of a sibling), but these are brief and interference with functioning is transient; such children are only minimally disturbing to others and are not considered deviant by those who know them.
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