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Surname1Student’s Name:Instructor’s Name:Course Details:Date:Comparing and Contrasting Poems by Langston HughesThe end of slavery set in motion a series of events critical in the development of the African-American community. The face of the nation was reconstructed, both socially and culturally. With the liberation of African-Americans from their physical bondage, they were free to participate within the margins of American society during the Reconstruction period and throughout the Harlem Renaissance. The Harlem Renaissance was a period in the early twentiethcentury that saw the proliferation of black art amidst the struggle for equality and rampant violence against African-Americans. The journey has been harder for African Americans as history has put them in a position where they must forgive the wrong from the past, live in the present, and embrace it but never forget to stop history from repeating itself. The poet Langston Hughes explored the African American experience through his writing about the culture, struggles, and the role of the African American identity in society. He used poems like "I, too" sing America and "Negro" to show the complexities of the African American identity. In America, the African American experience is often thought of as singular, however there is a two-fold experience for an African American trying to embrace the American culture and the black heritage. Langston Hughes, in an optimistic tone, awakens the Blacks for a better tomorrow in two of his famous poems, "Negro," and "I, too."
Surname2Langston Hughes was one of the leading artists to be associated with the Harlem renaissance. In most of his poems, he portrayed how the black man often faces the dilemma of choosing to be black or to be American. Langston Hughes in the poem “Negro,” works superbly of depicting the manner in which dark individuals were treated in the 1920's. Right now period, the dark man was thought of as low class and not equivalent to white individuals. The current sonnet clarifies a portion of the numerous brutal disciplines they needed to endure just in light of the fact that the shade of their skin (Hughes).Langston Hughes, “Negro” poem is about the responsibilities of an African-American before the universal war, liberating the slaves (Hughes 2). The literary devices used in the poem give an image and help explain those duties. He uses simile a few times in the poem. In lines two, three, eighteen, and nineteen he says “Black as the night, Black like the depths of my Africa(Valenti 393).” He uses the literary device, simile to get his point across about how he pictures an African-American. The use of simile was used perfectly, because it helps you picture what he hasin his mind of an African-American. Without the use of the simile, it wouldn’t take anything

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