s-4 - Chinese counterfactuals Alfred Bloom (1981) argued...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chinese counterfactuals Alfred Bloom (1981) argued that Chinese speakers have more trouble with counterfactuals than speakers of English do, because ‘If X were to do Y, then Z would happen’ has no straightforward translation in Chinese. We on the other hand have a (sort of) subjunctive: were . Does this make sense? Do you use the subjunctive? Bloom then did an experiment, and showed that, unlike English speakers, Chinese students gave wrong answers to statements about hypothetical false worlds. Shape similarity Judgments Lucy & Gaskins (2001) showed that adult English speakers tend to identify similarity of objects on basis of shape. But adult speakers of Yucatec Maya did not show the same-shape bias, but tend to generalize based on material. This difference corresponds to linguistic differences (YM uses classifiers + material), suggesting that judgments of similarity are influenced by the language one speaks. BUT maybe .
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/19/2011 for the course CJUS 310 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '09 term at Indiana.

Page1 / 2

s-4 - Chinese counterfactuals Alfred Bloom (1981) argued...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online