Fa10_intro

Fa10_intro - EES1001 Fall2010 Lecture Beury160 TR8:00am9:20...

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EES 1001 Introduction to Geology Fall 2010
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Important things to know… Lecture  Beury 160  T R 8:00 am – 9:20 All Labs are held in Barton Hall in rooms 301, 303  or 305 No Lab This Week!
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More Important things to know… Who am I - Where can you find  me?   Jesse Thornburg Office:   351B Beury Email:    [email protected] Office Hours:         Tuesday 11-3 pm          Thursday 10-1      - Or email me and we can work  out some other time.
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What is a geologist?  A geologist studies the Earth  Rocks record the story and  act as the archive geo ” = Earth logos ” = discourse Geology seeks to understand our  world and our place in it.
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  Physical:   Materials/processes   Historical:  Chronology Physical vs. Historical Geology Geology is more than just rocks.
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Dynamic Earth What?   vs. Why? Understanding processes  is difficult - Earth is constantly  changing - Earth is dynamic.
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Understanding the dynamics
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2005 2006 2007 Images courtesy of  NOAA 2008 2009
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Variations in Scale Photo by Michael Hozik Photo courtesy of USGS Picture courtesy of NASA
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Variations in Rate Photo courtesy of USGS Photo courtesy of wikipedia
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The Earth as a System  Consider the operation of the whole  Earth  Earth’s 4 systems Picture courtesy of NASA Picture courtesy of NASA Geosphere Hydrosphere Picture courtesy of MIT OCW Atmosphere Picture courtesy of NASA Biosphere Picture courtesy of global carbon project
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Biosphere Courtesy of global carbon project Atmosphere Picture courtesy of NASA Hydrosphere Picture courtesy of MIT OCW Picture courtesy of NASA Geospher e The Earth as a System These systems all operate independently The result is complex and dynamic interactions But they also interact
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This note was uploaded on 04/19/2011 for the course EES 2001 taught by Professor Thornburg during the Spring '11 term at Temple.

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Fa10_intro - EES1001 Fall2010 Lecture Beury160 TR8:00am9:20...

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