millikan - Calculating the charge of an electron from...

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Calculating the charge of an electron from Millikan oil drop experiment: The idea is that each charged particle (observed in the experiment) is made up of a number of electrons and so the total charge of that particle must be a whole number multiple of the electron charge. Suppose that we have a unit for measuring electron charge that gives a value of -1 for the charge on each electron. Then all particles that we would observe in Millikan’s experiment would be whole number multiples of this value. If for example, the charged particle contained 5 electrons, then the charge on that particle would be -5. If it contained 8 electrons, then the total charge of that particle would be -8. But notice that we can never have a particle with a charge of -7.5 for example since that would require 7.5 electrons. ...and we can not have partial electrons. Now the same case exists in reality with the charge of - 1 . 60 × 10 - 19 C for each electron. If we have 2 electrons in our particle, then we have a
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This note was uploaded on 04/19/2011 for the course CHEM 1031 taught by Professor Thomas during the Fall '06 term at Temple.

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millikan - Calculating the charge of an electron from...

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