limericks - Page 1 of 3 Writing Limericks Limericks are a...

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Page 1 of 3 "Writing Limericks" © 2008 by Lynne Berry Author of Duck Skates , Duck Dunks , and The Curious Demise of a Contrary Cat www.LynneBerry.com * Lynne.Berry@LynneBerry.com Writing Limericks Limericks are a fun, fun, fun form of poetry! Limericks have a bouncy, catchy rhythm. They also have a simple structure that can help young poets write with confidence. The structure of a limerick Limericks have five lines. The rhyme scheme is A-A-B-B-A. This means that the first, second, and fifth lines rhyme; and the third and fourth lines rhyme. The rhythm of a limerick is: (da) da DA da da DA da da DA (da) (da) (da) da DA da da DA da da DA (da) (da) (da) da DA da da DA (da) (da) (da) da DA da da DA (da) (da) (da) da DA da da DA da da DA (da) (da) In this rhythm, DA represents a stressed syllable, da represents an unstressed syllable, and (da) represents an optional unstressed syllable at the beginning or end of a line. Try reading the lines out loud, disregarding the optional syllables, and coming down hard on the DA syllables. That's the basic rhythm of a limerick! Just keep in mind you can tinker with the syllable count a bit by including 0, 1, or 2 unstressed
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limericks - Page 1 of 3 Writing Limericks Limericks are a...

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