Ch 33 Invertebrates - Phylogentic Relationships of Animals...

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Phylogentic Relationships of Animals Ancestral Protist segmentation true tissue radial symmetry bilateral symmetry Deuterostomes: eucoelom Protostome: schizocoelem pseudo coelom Porifera Cnideria Platyhelminthes Nematoda Mollusca Annelida Echinodermata Chordata Arthropoda no true tissues acoelom
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Eukaryotic, multicellular organisms with cells organized into distinct tissues. Heterotrophic nutrition Most exhibit significant capacity for locomotion. No cell walls; has a plasma membrane. Includes sponges, sea anemones, snails, insects, sea stars, fish, reptiles, birds, and human beings. Kingdom Animalia
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Phylum Porifera Class Desmospongiae Class Calcarea Class Hexactinellida Class Sclerospongia
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No true tissues or organs No symmetry No nerves, muscles, mouth or digestive system or Sessile Reproduce sexually and asexually Skeletons composed of CaCO 3 or SiO 2 spicules or spongin Filter feeders Phylum Porifera 5,000 species
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Consists of organized cells supported by a skeleton of: spongin fibers calcareous spicules silica spicules a combination of these, or perhaps no skeletal structure at all
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No Gut Sponges Phylum Porifera
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A few species of fish seaslugs hawks bill and loggerhead turtles Can use toxins to ward off predators
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Sponges provide habitat for wide variety of animals. As many as 16,000 different species of animals have been found in one loggerhead sponge.
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Most marine sponges (>80%) All freshwater sponges Leuconoid Spongin and SiO 2 spicules
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Contains all asconoid forms Most syconoids Generally small in stature CaCO 3 spicules
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Mostly deep sea forms Glass-like lattice work SiO 2 spicules
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CaCO 3 foundation with SiO 2 spicules Found in Pacific and West Indies
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Asexual: production of external buds that detach or remain to form colonies internal buds called gemmules that form during unfavorable periods fragmentation (regeneration) Sexual (mostly hermaphroditic): eggs are retained in the mesohyl and fertilized by motile sperm that enter through the internal canals.
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This note was uploaded on 04/20/2011 for the course BIOL 172 taught by Professor Huddleston,m during the Spring '08 term at University of Hawaii, Manoa.

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Ch 33 Invertebrates - Phylogentic Relationships of Animals...

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