4._New_Century_Revised_S08

4._New_Century_Revised_S08 - Chapter 4 The New Century...

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Chapter 4 The New Century
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2 Emergence of Competition The Old House was dominant But markets were shifting Kerosene’s dominance threatened by electric lighting – technological change California Standard’s dominance begins to decline
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3 Markets Lost… Kerosene, Gas, Candles all had same problems: Produced soot, dirt, and heat Consumed Oxygen Always danger of fire Thomas Alva Edison Turned to the problem of electric illumination in 1877 In 2 years, developed the heat resistant light bulb Commercialized the invention electric generation industry Priced to compete w/ town gas
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4 Industrial Research For Edison innovation/research was not a hobby but a business “We can’t be like the old German professor who as long as he can get his black bread and beer is content to spend his whole life studying the fuzz on a bee!” Edison’s lab eventually became the famous Bell Laboratories
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5 The Electric Light Bulb Electricity offered superior light 1885: 250,000 light bulbs in use 1902: 18 million Development deeply threatening to oil industry The light bulb was a true marvel of the time.
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6 …and Markets Gained Horseless Carriage Vehicles powered by the internal combustion engine Noisy, noxious, not very reliable Skepticism to endorsement by 1906 SF earthquake Henry Ford Quit his job so he could design, manufacture, and sell a gasoline-powered vehicle By 1905, gasoline-powered car defeated its competitors for automotive locomotion Second major market for petroleum: Fuel Oil Used in boilers in factories, trains, and ships 1904 Model C 2 Cylinder Studebaker - The Oldest Motorized Studebaker Known to Exist!
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7 Car Culture First auto race was so slow & boring (15 mph) someone yelled, “Get a horse!” The SF Earthquake in 1906 demonstrated the importance of the car – 200 pressed into service Standard Oil donated gasoline Someone wrote: “ Automobile is no longer a theme for jokes.” “The man who owns a motorcar gets for himself, besides the joy of touring, the adulation of the walking crowd, and… is a god to the women.” Cars sales 8,000 in 1900; 902,000 in 1912 All based on oil!
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Henry Ford and the Model T Ford saw fruits of his labor after 20 yrs with Model T in 1908 First affordable car that “put America on wheels” Potential: 45 mph; 25 mpg; 20 hp Mass production in Oct 1913; 308,162 in 1914 Production ended 1927 8
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9 Rise of Independents in PA In 1895: various interests formed Pure Oil Company Turned itself into a fully integrated company,
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This note was uploaded on 04/19/2011 for the course EGEE 120 taught by Professor Considine,timothy during the Spring '07 term at Penn State.

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4._New_Century_Revised_S08 - Chapter 4 The New Century...

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