Further practice, monopoly&monopsony_Solutions

Further practice, monopoly&monopsony_Solutions -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1. A drug company has a monopoly on a new patented medicine.  The product can be  made in either of two plants.  The costs of production for the two plants are MC 1  = 20  + 2Q 1 , and MC 2  = 10 + 5Q 2 .  The firm’s estimate of the demand for the product is P =  20 - 3(Q 1  + Q 2 ).  How much should the firm plan to produce in each plant?  At what  price should it plan to sell the product? First, notice that  only   MC 2  is relevant because the marginal cost curve of the  first plant lies above the demand curve. Price Q 10 20 30 3.3 6.7 MR MC 1  = 20 +2 Q 1 MC 2  = 10 + 5 Q 2 17.3 0.91 Figure 10.9 This means that the demand curve becomes   P   = 20 - 3 Q 2 . With an inverse  linear demand curve, we know that the marginal revenue curve has the same  vertical intercept but twice the slope, or   MR   = 20 - 6 Q 2 .   To determine the  profit-maximizing level of output, equate  MR  and  MC 2 : 20 - 6 Q 2  = 10 + 5 Q 2 , or Q Q = = 2 0 91 . . Price is determined by substituting the profit-maximizing quantity into the  demand equation: P = 20 - 3 0.91 ( 29 = 17.3 . 2.  Michelle’s  Monopoly  Mutant  Turtles  (MMMT)  has the exclusive right  to sell  Mutant Turtle t-shirts in the United States.  The demand for these t-shirts is Q =  10,000/P 2 .  The firm’s short-run cost is SRTC = 2,000 + 5Q, and its long-run cost is  LRTC = 6Q.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
a. What price should MMMT charge to maximize profit in the short run?  What quantity does it sell, and how much profit does it make?  Would it be  better off shutting down in the short run? MMMT should offer enough t-shirts such that  MR = MC .  In the short run,  marginal cost is the change in  SRTC  as the result of the production of another  t-shirt,   i.e., SRMC  = 5, the slope of the  SRTC  curve. Demand is: Q P = 10 000 2 , or, in inverse form, P  = 100Q -1/2 . Total revenue ( PQ ) is 100 Q 1/2 .  Taking the derivative of  TR  with respect to  Q , MR   = 50 Q -1/2 .   Equating   MR   and   MC   to determine the profit-maximizing  quantity: 5 = 50 Q -1/2 , or  Q  = 100. Substituting  Q =  100 into the demand function to determine price: P  = (100)(100 -1/2  ) = 10. The profit at this price and quantity is equal to total revenue minus total cost:
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/19/2011 for the course ECON 101 taught by Professor Gul during the Spring '11 term at Lahore School of Economics.

Page1 / 7

Further practice, monopoly&monopsony_Solutions -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online