Week 3 DQ 2 - In some cases there can be infinite...

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Due on Thursday · How do you know if a value is a solution for an inequality? How is this different from determining if a value is a solution to an equation? If you replace the equal sign of an equation with an inequality sign, is there ever a time when the same value will be a solution to both the equation and the inequality? Write an inequality and provide a value that may or may not be a solution to the inequality. 1. Consider responding to a classmate by determining whether or not the solution provided is a solution to the inequality. If the value he or she provides is a solution, provide a value that is not a solution. If the value is not a solution, provide a value that is a solution. You know if a value is the solution to an inequality if it fulfills the inequality. If it agrees that the value is either greater than, less than, equal to another value, then it is a solution.
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Unformatted text preview: In some cases there can be infinite solutions. It is different from determining the value from an equation since you can mostly only have a discrete value of solutions. If the value is a solution, it must fulfill the agreement that both sides are equal, unlike in inequalities where they could be less, equal or greater than each other. There are no cases where that will work unless you replace the equal sign with a less than or equal to or greater than or equal to. Then only that works. 3x+2 > 2x+3 Is 5 a solution? Is -1 a solution? HINT: Solve this inequality. .. and then plug and chug Solution: I believe the solution to your inequality is 5. 3x+2 > 2x+3 3(5)+2>2(5)+3 15+2>10+3 17>13 - This is a true statement. 17 is greater than 13....
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This note was uploaded on 04/20/2011 for the course MATH 116 taught by Professor Mcmillian during the Spring '09 term at University of Phoenix.

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Week 3 DQ 2 - In some cases there can be infinite...

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