Week 1 DQ 4 - expression with all the variables in the...

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Week 1 DQ 2 Due Day 4 (Thursday) In your own words, detail the process of polynomial division when the divisor is a monomial. Demonstrate the process with an example. How does this process change when the divisor is not a monomial? Explain in your own words how to evaluate a polynomial for a given value of the variable. Demonstrate the process with an example. _____________________________________________________________________________ _ When we divide a polynomial by a monomial, we only have to divide each term only once. For example: + + 2x4 8x3 16x2x = + + 2x42x 8x32x 16x2x = + + x3 4x2 8 When we divide by divisor which is not a monomial but rather a binomial or trinomial, you have to use each term divide by each term of the divisor. Evaluating a polynomial means substituting numbers in for the variables and having an expression with ONLY numbers in it and then solving it. Simplifying it means that the
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Unformatted text preview: expression with all the variables in the simplest form meaning no parenthesis, exponents etc. A real life polynomial expression would be the compound interest formula: = + A P1 rnnt The “P” stands for the principal amount placed in the bank, the “r” designates for the rate, the “n” means how the principal is compounded (if annually, then n = 1, if quarterly, then n = 4, if daily, then n = 365). “T” means time in years. If we say the principal is 1000 dollars, rate is 5 percent, and time is 10 years, this is how it will be: = + A P1 rnnt = +. × A 10001 051 10 = . A 10001 0510 ≈ . A $1628 9 This means that if you invest 1000 dollars in a bank at 5 percent interest for 10 years compounding, you will get back $1628.9 approximately....
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This note was uploaded on 04/20/2011 for the course MATH 116 taught by Professor Mcmillian during the Spring '09 term at University of Phoenix.

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Week 1 DQ 4 - expression with all the variables in the...

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