6 - Muscular System - Chapter 10 Muscle Tissue Pages 301...

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Chapter 10 Muscle Tissue Pages 301 – 314; 318 – 320; 324—328; 331 Types of Muscle Tissue 40-50% body weight Chemical energy mechanical energy ATP movement (due to alternate contraction/relaxation of muscle) Myo = muscles Types of muscles o Skeletal Striated Mostly voluntary Diaphragm subconsciously o Cardiac Striated Branching Autorhythmic (involuntary) Perform contraction/relaxation on its own No nervous signal necessary! Pacemaker - generates own signal o Smooth Non-striated Autorhythmic (involuntary) Controled by autonomic nervous system GI tract (digestive system) Functions of Muscle Tissue 1. Movement Heart (main job is to move substance) 2. Stabilizing body positions 3. Storing & Moving substance Stomach Sphincters (allows us to store things) Urinary Bladder 4. Generating heat (37 0 C) Actions of muscles produce a lot of heat Shivering (involuntary) – generate more heat when necessary 5. Support soft tissue Abdominal organs protected by muscles Pelvis rests on the muscles Properties of Muscle Tissue 1. Electrical excitability – ability to generate an action potential (electrical impulses) If you can’t produce an electrical impulse, muscle can’t function 2. Contractility 3. Extensibility – expand without damaging 4. Elasticity – return to original position
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Eating: muscles can stretch Skeletal Muscle Tissue ( Figure 10.1 ) Muscle Fibers (cells) Periosteum – outer covering of bone Tendon – woven into periosteum of bone Myofibrils o 4-8 inches long o Multinucleated – many cells combined together Axons – innervate Fascia – outermost covering that separates individual muscles/group of muscles o Connective tissue that surrounds muscles Neuromuscular Junction o Nervous system – controls muscles o Nervous system “talks” to muscle at neuromuscular junction Muscle Fasicle Muscle Fiber Myofibril Epimysium – surrounds whole muscle Perimysium – surrounds fascicle Endomysium - fascicle 2
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Microscopic Anatomy of a Skeletal Muscle Fiber Myoblast o Fusion of many myoblasts multinucleated Form a muscle fiber (cell) Loses ability to undergo mitosis # of muscle fivers constant in the body Only enlargement of the myofibrils Does NOT divide Parts of a Skeletal Muscle Fiber o Satellite cell – an old myoblast Fuse to damaged muscle fiber for repair Have a limited amount of satellite cells Will more than likely have scar tissue instead of satellite cells
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This note was uploaded on 04/20/2011 for the course BIO 302 taught by Professor De during the Spring '10 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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6 - Muscular System - Chapter 10 Muscle Tissue Pages 301...

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