Welcome to the Anthropocene Transcript

Welcome to the Anthropocene Transcript - Welcome to the...

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Welcome to the Anthropocene Epoch Ask a geologist and you'll find out that we have been living in the Holocene Epoch. It began 12,000 years ago, a mere blink of an eye in geologic time. But scientists say humans have made such irreversible changes to the Earth that we've entered a new epoch: the Anthropocene Epoch. February 16, 2008 text size A A A Copyright © 2008 National Public Radio®. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required. ANDREA SEABROOK, host: Ask a geologist and you'll find out that we are living in the Holocene Epoch. It began 12,000 years ago, a mere blink of the eye in geologic time. But now, some researchers believe we've entered a new epoch of our own making. This week, on Science Out of the Box, the Anthropocene age, a time when humans are literally shaping the earth. Two geologists who think it's time we acknowledge this new reality are Jan Zalasiewicz and Mark Williams. They're researchers at the University of Leicester and authors of a new paper on the Anthropocene Epoch. They join me now. Welcome. Dr. JAN ZALASIEWICZ (Researcher, University of Leicester): Hello. Dr. MARK WILLIAMS (Researcher, University of Leicester): Hello. SEABROOK: What makes this the Anthropocene Epoch? Dr. ZALASIEWICZ: Well, we've been living in the Holocene Epoch for about the last 11,000 years, but we think now that human modification of the planet is so great, is so enormous that perhaps we've actually entered a new epoch of time, the Anthropocene. Now that term the Anthropocene was actually coined by a Dutch atmospheric chemist Paul Crutzen about five or six years ago. And what Paul Crutzen thought was that changes to atmospheric chemistry changes in levels of CO2 in the atmosphere for example, changes in
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This note was uploaded on 04/21/2011 for the course GEO 101 taught by Professor Terpestra during the Fall '09 term at Grand Valley State.

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Welcome to the Anthropocene Transcript - Welcome to the...

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