Diet and the Evolution of Salivary Amylase DBQ

Diet and the Evolution of Salivary Amylase DBQ - Diet and...

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Diet and the Evolution of Salivary Amylase Background: In 1982, McGeachin and Akin published a study that showed that New World monkeys (Atelidae; e.g. howler monkeys, spider monkeys and woolly monkeys of South and Central America; these monkeys have prehensile tails) do not produce salivary amylase. These monkeys also tend to consume little starch in their diets. On the other hand, McGeachin and Akin found that Old World monkeys, especially those in the subfamily cercopithecines (a subfamily of Old World monkeys including macaques and mangabeys) have relatively high salivary amylase expression, even compared to humans. These monkeys also consume a diet high in starch, including the seeds of unripe fruits that they store in pouches in their mouths for long time periods. The evolution of hominids (the family of Primates within which humans are the only extant members) is characterized by significant dietary shifts, facilitated in part by the development of stone tool technology, the control of fire and, most recently, the domestication of plants and
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Diet and the Evolution of Salivary Amylase DBQ - Diet and...

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