How Many Fish are in that Pond

How Many Fish are in that Pond - CLASS COPY How Many Fish...

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CLASS COPY How Many Fish are in that Pond? Using the Repetitive Mark-Recapture Method to Estimate Population Size Biologists often need to count organisms. They may want to count cells on a microscope slide in order to test for disease. They may want to count trees in a forest in order to assess the productivity of an ecosystem. They may want to count salamanders in a stream in order to assess the impact of pollution. Biologists use different techniques for each of these measurements. For many kinds of organisms, it is virtually impossible to count every single individual. If biologists want to count organisms that can move around (disperse), reproduce, or die, then they have to use methods that take these kinds of fluctuations into account. One sampling method used for estimating animal populations is called repetitive mark-recapture sampling. For example, a biologist might drop nets in a pond to determine the population of a certain kind of fish. Once collected, each fish is marked by clipping part of a fin and then is released back to the pond. After a certain amount of time, the nets are dropped again and another sample of fish is caught. Some of the fish in
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This note was uploaded on 04/21/2011 for the course BIO 105 taught by Professor Staff during the Winter '08 term at Grand Valley State University.

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How Many Fish are in that Pond - CLASS COPY How Many Fish...

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