form1 - The whole is greater than the sum of the parts...

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The whole is greater than the sum of the parts “Glass Patterns” 1. Perceptual Organization A. Gestalt Grouping i. Similarity. ii. Proximity iii. Good continuation iv. Pragnanz v. Meaningfulness/Familiarity The Gestalt rules specify how parts are grouped for form wholes. 1. Perceptual Organization B. Filters, Convolution, Neural Images 1
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1. Perceptual Organization C. Modern interpretations of Gestalt Grouping i. Similarity. 1. Perceptual Organization C. Modern interpretations of Gestalt Grouping ii. Proximity. 2. Extraction of elementary image features A. Visual grouping and texture segmentation i. Examples of texture and conclusions about features (Beck, 1966). 2
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2. Extraction of elementary image features A. Visual grouping and texture segmentation ii. Examples of texture and conclusions about features (Treisman, 1986). 2. Extraction of elementary image features B. The visual search task i. feature searches vs. conjunction searches 3
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2. Extraction of elementary image features B. The visual search task ii. Parallel vs. Serial searches 2. Extraction of elementary image features B. The visual search task ii. 2D Feature differences that “pop out” in visual search Orientation differences Size differences Colour differences Intensity differences Disparity/Distance differences Motion differences iii. Targets defined by conjunctions of these features do not pop out Therefore, these are the features that are encoded in parallel across the visual field and which may then be assembled to form objects 2. Extraction of elementary image features C. Some basic features are unexpected 4
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2. Extraction of elementary image features C. Some basic features are unexpected Note:Visual Search is a very popular paradigm A. Treisman and Gelade (1980) B. Over 600 articles have the term “visual search” in the title C. The Vsearch program (Enns and Rensink) 3. Coding of boundaries and contours A. Perception of contours B. Neural coding of subjective contours 5
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3. Coding of boundaries and contours C. Visual search and subjective contours iv. Gurnsey, Humphrey and Kapitan (1992) 6
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3. Coding of boundaries and contours C. Visual search, attention and subjective contours iv. Gurnsey, Humphrey and Kapitan (1992) 4. Representation of Shapes A. Evidence for Separate Pathways in Shape Perception 7
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4. Representation of Shapes A. Evidence for Separate Pathways in Shape
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This note was uploaded on 04/20/2011 for the course PSYC 212 taught by Professor Shahin during the Fall '11 term at McGill.

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form1 - The whole is greater than the sum of the parts...

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