Objects - Object Recognition A. Matching images to memory....

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Object Recognition A. Matching images to memory. i. Associating a representation computed from the image with a representation stored in memory. ii. Template matching. i. Simple Correlation Object Recognition A. Matching images to memory. i. Associating a representation computed from the image with a representation stored in memory. ii. Template matching. i. Simple Correlation ii. Correlation with a “canonical” template Object Recognition A. Matching images to memory. i. Associating a representation computed from the image with a representation stored in memory. ii. Template matching. i. Simple Correlation ii. Correlation with a “canonical” template iii. Limitations of template matching 1
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Object Recognition A. Matching images to memory. iii. Structural Descriptions. Object Recognition A. Matching images to memory. iv. Viewer centred representations -- the relationships between the components of a structural description are expressed in terms of the retinal coordinates of the image of the object. v. Object centred representations -- the relationships between the components of a structural description are expressed in terms of coordinates intrinsic to the object. ° permits recognition of objects from a novel point of view ° requires extracting an object centred representation from an viewer centred representation (image features). ° whether or not memory representations are object centred is an empirical question that is debated. Object Recognition B. Recognition by Components: Geon Theory. i. Context ° Class of images considered: count nouns (a giraffe, four chairs) vs mass nouns (water, snow). ° Studies mainly line drawings because line-drawings of objects can typically be identified as quickly as full colour or grey scale images of these objects. ° Processing environment: (a) applies to situations in which any of a large number of objects might occur and (b) does not consider contextual cues. ° Primal access : the initial classification of an unanticipated, isolated concrete count-noun object. Object Recognition B. Recognition by Components: Geon Theory. ii. Typically, an object can be recognized ° Rapidly ° When viewed from most novel orientations ° Under moderate levels of visual noise ° When partially occluded ° When it is a new exemplar of a category iii. Implications ° Access to the mental representation of an object should not be dependent on absolute judgments of quantitative
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This note was uploaded on 04/20/2011 for the course PSYC 212 taught by Professor Shahin during the Fall '11 term at McGill.

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Objects - Object Recognition A. Matching images to memory....

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