Week 1 - History of Psychology SV

Week 1 - History of Psychology SV - Psychology Past and...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Psychology Past and Present
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
What Is Psychology? The scientific study of behavior and the mind. Psychologists employ systematic, objective, methods of observing mental processes Emotions: things you experience Behaviors: things you do Thoughts: beliefs and attitudes
Background image of page 2
Foundations of Psychology The roots of psychology are far-reaching. They were developed by philosophers, physicists, physiologists, and naturalists: Behavior and mental experiences have physical causes, so we can study them. The way a person thinks and behaves is modified over time by the environment. The human body is a product of evolutionary processes.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
History of Psychology Wilhem Wundt (1879) was the first person to open a psychology laboratory. However, the roots of psychological investigation predate this defining moment: The Greeks speculated about intelligence, the senses, and the physical state of the mind. The Renaissance saw a renewed interest in human anatomy and nerve functioning. The Enlightenment brought about empirical inquiry and secular philosophy. Before we had a “scientific theory of mind,” the reigning conception of the body and mind was dualism.
Background image of page 4
Descartes’ Dualism “I am thinking, therefore I exist” The assumption that the body and mind are separate, though perhaps interacting, entities. Challenged the idea that the soul was responsible for bodily actions Thinking separates humans from other animals Ascribed just one function to the soul: thought
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Example of Dualism Reflexes Foot touches fire causing a “thread” to be pulled in the skin The thread opens the ventricle of the pineal gland “Animal spirits” flow through the tube and cause you to withdraw your foot
Background image of page 6
Problems with Dualism The mind is non-physical and the body is physical, so how do they interact? How can an immaterial mind cause anything in a material body, and vice-versa? If the mind is separate from the body, how do you explain the changes brain damaged individuals undergo?
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Hobbes’ Materialism British philosopher who, at the same time, took Descartes’ ideas a step further: The soul is a meaningless concept. All that exists is matter and energy. Consciousness is a product of the areas of the brain interacting. Problem: How can the physical give rise to subjective conscious experiences?
Background image of page 8
Defining Consciousness “What it’s like to be . . .” Subjectivity or Phenomenality Qualia The Hard Problem of Consciousness
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Zombies!
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/20/2011 for the course PSY 3001 taught by Professor Tallon during the Spring '11 term at Dowling.

Page1 / 35

Week 1 - History of Psychology SV - Psychology Past and...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online