Syllabus - Mind & Behavior I Spring 2011

Syllabus - Mind & Behavior I Spring 2011 - Mind...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Professor: Dr. Jennifer Tallon Office: RC 200 C E-mail: TallonJ@dowling.edu Required Textbooks Blackmore, S. (2005). Consciousness: A Very Short Introduction . New York, NY: Oxford University Press. Linden, D.J. (2007). The Accidental Mind: How Brain Evolution Has Given Us Love, Memory, Dreams, and God. Cambridge, MA: Belknap/Harvard. Damasio, A. (1999). The Feeling of What Happens: Body and Emotion in the Making of Consciousness . Orlando, FL: Harcourt. Schacter, D.L. (2001). Searching for Memory: The Brain, the Mind, and the Past . New York, NY: Basic Books. Fine, C. (2006). A Mind of its Own: How Your Brain Distorts and Deceives . New York, NY: Norton. Supplemental readings provided by the instructor. 0 Course Description A course designed to introduce students to how psychology has historically attempted to gain knowledge about the varieties of human experience. This course will cover such topics as: the 19th century characteristics of psychological inquiry; the study of consciousness, perception, and other altered states; 19th and 20th century views about motivation, feelings, and emotions; the development of theories about personality and self; plus, the movement towards cognitive science and the evolution of concepts related to artificial intelligence. As a CORE course, PSY 3101C is designed to acquaint each student with information that will meet the Dowling College general education goals. Course Objectives The objectives of the Dowling CORE curriculum are as follows: 1. Each graduate is knowledgeable with respect to the course of Western Civilization from its Judeo Christian and Greco-Roman origins to the modern era including knowledge of the works, concepts, values, and attitudes that characterize the modern mind. 2. Each graduate is knowledgeable with respect to contemporary non-Western societies and civilizations including knowledge of the works, concepts, values, and attitudes that characterize contemporary non-Western societies. 3. Each graduate appreciates the role of the arts in human experience and possesses the ability to analyze a work of art and to distinguish different artistic styles and the social and intellectual conditions that fostered them. 1 Spring 2011, Dowling College 11:30 – 12:51 Tuesday/Thursday, Room 418 RC
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4. Each graduate is knowledgeable with respect to the nature of the biophysical universe and the scientific method that seeks to make it comprehensible and serviceable to society, including an ability to synthesize and critically analyze statistical data. 5. Each graduate has an informed understanding of the dynamics of contemporary societies across the globe and the social, political, and economic systems that drive them, including the major trends (e.g., technology) and the major issues (e.g., environmental degradation) affecting them. 6. Each graduate is knowledgeable with respect to the psychological and sociological dimensions of human
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 6

Syllabus - Mind & Behavior I Spring 2011 - Mind...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online