Supplier Quality Answer

Supplier Quality Answer - Managing Supplier Quality:...

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This edition is intended for use outside of the U.S. only, with content that may be different from the U.S. Edition. This may not be resold, copied, or distributed without the prior consent of the publisher. Managing Supplier Quality: Integrated Devices Instructor’s Guide
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This edition is intended for use outside of the U.S. only, with content that may be different from the U.S. Edition. This may not be resold, copied, or distributed without the prior consent of the publisher. 2 This case examines many issues relating to supplier quality management. A key point of this case is that even simple, relatively inexpensive items can cause non-conformances disproportionate to the value of the item. In this case, an inexpensive molding bracket can cause the failure of the finished product and disrupt production schedules Assignment: 1. Calculate the Cp and Cpk of the process that produces the component purchased by Integrated Devices. Is the process at D-Tec Plastics capable of meeting the design requirement of the component? What should be a target Cpk level? Discussion: This first requires calculation of the process capability, or Cp: Cp = Specification width ---------------------- Process width (or 6 x the sample standard deviation) = +/-.06 = .12 specification width ------------------------------------ .1777 (6 x .0229629) Note: .0282 is the standard deviation of the sample, which is calculated from the sample data provided in the case = .675 Because the observations in Exhibit 1 average to 4.000, no need exists to calculate Α k which is the penalty for off-centering. If off centering occurs, then we would use the following formula: k = (Design center - grand mean) ---------------------------------------- (Specification width/2) Then, calculate Cpk using the following formula: Cpk = (1-k)(Cp) This process, with a Cp of .675, is not capable at a level that will prevent quality defects from occurring. Generally acceptable minimum Cpk levels are 1.33. However, in many industries the required minimum is now 2.0 or higher. 2. Why is it important to prove that a process is capable before developing statistical control limits (SPC charts)?
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This edition is intended for use outside of the U.S. only, with content that may be different from the U.S. Edition. This may not be resold, copied, or distributed without the prior consent of the publisher. 3 Discussion: It may be inaccurate to chart a process that is first shown to be incapable. A process that is not capable is one that has too much variability or inconsistency in its output. When developing statistical process control limits we do not consider or take into account specification targets (i.e., the range that design engineers say is acceptable when producing an item). The formulas for developing upper and lower control limits rely heavily, however, on a value called average R (range) in the calculation. (See Part B of this case for formulas). R is the variability within a sample identified from measures of actual output
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Supplier Quality Answer - Managing Supplier Quality:...

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