Negotiation Television Solution

Negotiation Television Solution - Case Discussion: Buying a...

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This edition is intended for use outside of the U.S. only, with content that may be different from the U.S. Edition. This may not be resold, copied, or distributed without the prior consent of the publisher. 1 Case Discussion: Buying a New Television Case This is a good case to use for a short negotiation in class (30 minutes or less). Be sure to give the participants time to plan their negotiating strategy. To set up this case, explain to the class that they will be placed in buyer or sellers, and they should turn to the individual next to them who is the closest buyer/seller. This type of random picking ensures that individuals do not pair up with only their friends. Next, have them read the general information on the first page, and jointly decide which scenario with their partner they would like to “simulate”. Finally, have them read the buyer/seller information (ensuring that the other party does not have access to this information), then let them negotiation for approximately 10 minutes until an agreement is reached. Make sure that both parties sign the contract with the stated terms, and have them hand in the agreement at the end of the period. Also, make sure that each individual calculates their “total cost” based on the individual calculations shown. Once an agreement is reached, have the students share their agreements, and write them up on the board. The instructor should also receive the results of the negotiation in the form of a written contract. Be sure to explore the students’ reaction to their opponent’s strategy in the discussion, particularly if you noted instances of “dishonest” manipulations taking place. This can bring up the point of whether students took a “hard ball” or “concessionary” strategy, and which was most successful under different conditions. Emphasize that this is a “spot buy” situation – the buyer and seller are unlikely to have further transactions in the near future. However, the possibility of poor word of mouth is an issue that sellers may have to contend with in the future. The specific underlying “drivers” for behavior can be explored as well.
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This edition is intended for use outside of the U.S. only, with content that may be different from the U.S. Edition. This may not be resold, copied, or distributed without the prior consent of the publisher. 2 TV Case – General Information The following are four situations that you can use as a basis for your position in this negotiation case. First, discuss the four situations with your opponent, and jointly select the one that you feel is most appropriate relative to your interests. Situation 1: It is Thursday, January 27, at 6:30 p.m. and you have just sat down to watch the national news on your fifteen-year-old 26” television. As you turn on the news, you hear a pop in the back of the TV, and you realize that your old TV has blown up, probably beyond repair potential. The Super Bowl is 72 hours away and you are planning to entertain out-of-town guests for the event. Situation 2:
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Negotiation Television Solution - Case Discussion: Buying a...

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