224s.09.lec12

224s.09.lec12 - CS224S/LING281 SpeechRecognition,Synthesis,...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–14. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CS 224S/LING 281  Speech Recognition, Synthesis,  and Dialogue Dan Jurafsky Lecture 12: Dialog Part I:  Human  conversation, frame-based  dialogue systems, and VoiceXML
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Outline The Linguistics of Conversation Basic Conversational Agents ASR NLU Generation Dialogue Manager Dialogue Manager Design Finite State Frame-based Initiative: User, System, Mixed VoiceXML
Background image of page 2
Conversational Agents AKA: Spoken Language Systems Dialogue Systems Speech Dialogue Systems Applications: Travel arrangements (Amtrak, United airlines) Telephone call routing Tutoring Communicating with robots Anything with limited screen/keyboard
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
A travel dialog: Communicator Xu and Rudnicky (2000)
Background image of page 4
Call routing: ATT HMIHY Goren et al. (1997)
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
A tutorial dialogue: ITSPOKE Litman and Silliman (2004)
Background image of page 6
Linguistics of Human Conversation Turn-taking Speech Acts Grounding Conversational Structure Implicature
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Turn-taking Dialogue is characterized by turn- taking. A: B: A: B: Resource allocation problem: How do speakers know when to take  the floor?
Background image of page 8
Turn-taking rules Sacks et al. (1974) At each transition-relevance place of each  turn: a.  If during this turn the current speaker has  selected B as the next speaker then B must  speak next. b. If the current speaker does not select the  next speaker, any other speaker may take the  next turn. c. If no one else takes the next turn, the  current speaker may take the next turn.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Implications of subrule a For some utterances the current speaker selects the  next speaker Adjacency pairs Question/answer Greeting/greeting Compliment/downplayer Request/grant Silence between 2 parts of adjacency pair is different  than silence after A: Is there something bothering you or not? (1.0) A: Yes or no? (1.5) A: Eh B: No.
Background image of page 10
Speech Acts Austin (1962): An utterance is a kind of  action Clear case:  performatives I name this ship the Titanic I second that motion I bet you five dollars it will snow tomorrow Performative verbs (name, second) Austin’s idea: not just these verbs
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Each utterance is 3 acts Locutionary act : the utterance of a  sentence with a particular meaning Illocutionary act : the act of asking,  answering, promising, etc., in uttering a  sentence. Perlocutionary act : the (often intentional)  production of certain effects upon the  thoughts, feelings, or actions of addressee  in uttering a sentence.
Background image of page 12
Locutionary and illocutionary “You can’t do that!” Illocutionary force: Protesting Perlocutionary force: Effect  of annoying addressee Effect  of stopping addressee from doing  something
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 14
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/21/2011 for the course CS 224 taught by Professor De during the Spring '11 term at Kentucky.

Page1 / 65

224s.09.lec12 - CS224S/LING281 SpeechRecognition,Synthesis,...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 14. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online