adm_radio_net

adm_radio_net - Autonomic Data Management for the Radio...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Web ProForum Tutorials http://www.iec.org Copyright © The International Engineering Consortium 1/13 Autonomic Data Management for the Radio Network Controller Topics 1. What is a Radio Network Controller? 2. RNC Functions 3. Complex Environment 4. Autonomic Data Management 5. Autonomic Data Management in the RNC Self-Test Correct Answers Glossary 1. What is a Radio Network Controller? A Radio Network Controller (RNC) provides the interface between the wireless devices communicating through Node B transceivers and the network edge. This includes controlling and managing the radio transceivers in the Node B equipment, as well as management tasks like soft handoff. The RNC performs tasks in a 3G wireless network analogous to those of the Base Station Controller (BSC) in a 2G or 2.5G network. It interfaces with GPRS Service Nodes (SGSNs) and Gateways (GGSNs) to mediate with the network service providers.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Web ProForum Tutorials http://www.iec.org Copyright © The International Engineering Consortium 2/13 Figure 1. The RNC in its Context 2. RNC Functions A radio network controller manages hundreds of Node B transceiver stations while switching and provisioning services off the Mobile Switching Center and 3G data network interfaces. The connection from the RNC to a Node B is called the User Plane Interface Layer and it uses T1/E1 transport to the RNC. Due to the large number of Node B transceivers, a T1/E1 aggregator is used to deliver the Node B data over channelized OC-3 optical transport to the RNC. The OC-3 pipe can be a direct connection to the RNC or through traditional SONET/SDH transmission networks. A typical Radio Network Controller may be built on a PICMG or Advanced TCA chassis. It contains several different kinds of cards specialized for performing the functions and interacting with the various interfaces of the RNC.
Background image of page 2
http://www.iec.org Copyright © The International Engineering Consortium 3/13 Figure 2: RNC Interfaces Typical line card functions are as follows. Controller Cards The controller card controls the entire chassis and performs application-level functions complementary to the other line cards. It also interfaces to the Element Management System (EMS). Because this role is so critical, typically a pair of redundant cards is used. Radio Access Network (RAN) Line Cards This card is a Node B controller. A Node B aggregates T1/E1 uplinks and forwards OC-3 optical data to the RNC. Core Network (CN) Cards These cards provide OC-12 connections to the back-end circuit-switched and packet-switched infrastructure. The CN card provides the bandwidth to manage the Node B traffic from the RAN line cards. Real Time Unit (RTU) Line Cards This card implements real-time user stream processing that is complementary to the other line cards. These control functions span all RAN and CN interfaces in and out of the RNC. Multiple RTU cards with redundant Gigabit Ethernet links are required to support the bi-directional traffic. Ethernet Switching Modules
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/21/2011 for the course CS 224 taught by Professor De during the Spring '11 term at Kentucky.

Page1 / 13

adm_radio_net - Autonomic Data Management for the Radio...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online