Session_24__Human_R_2ndHalf2010

Session_24__Human_R_2ndHalf2010 - Human Resources Policies...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Click to edit Master subtitle style Human Resources Policies and Unions Dr. Kristen DeTienne Organizational Behavior
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
22 Agenda Announcements Age Discrimination Disability Discrimination Racial Discrimination Affirmative Action Labor Unions
Background image of page 2
important? Today's aggrieved employees are increasingly turning to common law torts as a means for redressing their employment complaints against employers. In the 1980s, tort causes of action in employment cases were unusual--most suits were filed under federal or state statutes. Currently common law employment tort suits are commonplace, rather than a rarity. Consequently, human resource managers must become familiar with yet another facet of the complex, rapidly changing environment of employment law. Common law is derived from principles based on justice, reason and common sense rather than absolute, fixed or inflexible rules legislated into existence. The principles of common law have been determined by the needs of society and have changed as the conditions, interests, relations and usages of the community at large have changed. Common law is dynamic and subject to modification as societal expectations broaden. Thus, common law is an area of employment law expected to grow in usage in the coming years. A tort is a non-contractual private or civil wrong or injury resulting from a breach of a legal duty that exists by virtue of society's expectations regarding interpersonal conduct. As applied to employment situations, a tort is a private or civil wrong inflicted by an employer on an employee as a result of a breach of community-imposed obligations owed by the employer to the employee. Employment torts are of particular concern for two reasons: (1) organization size does not matter--small firms are just as likely to be charged as large firms, and (2) individual managers as well as the company itself may be held liable for compensatory, consequential and punitive damages. http://www.allbusiness.com/management/322411-1.html
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/22/2011 for the course ORG B 321 taught by Professor Kristendetienne during the Fall '10 term at BYU.

Page1 / 23

Session_24__Human_R_2ndHalf2010 - Human Resources Policies...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online