Study Guide Midterm II

Study Guide Midterm II - Chapter 29 What is the ecological...

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Chapter 29 What is the ecological importance of protists? - They convert light energy into chemical energy that other organisms can use to grow. Also produces sugar. What are some of the impacts that protists have on humans? - Many protists, like algae, are vital to our ecosystems and not harmful. Others, though, cause a range of serious human diseases…. Could protists have an impact on reducing global climate change? - Yes, they help reducing global climate change by breaking down carbon dioxide. How did the first eukaryotic cell likely arise? - How did endosymbiosis lead to the major lineages studied for midterm II? - It leads to major lineages studied today because it was the first theory that explained how a mutualistic advantage existed between the host and the engulfed cell. - The host provided the engulfed cell with protection and carbon compounds and in return received ATP. - Therefore, it explains how protists and bacteria exist today (proterobacteria). Why are the protists a paraphyletic group, and what would need to change for them to be a monophyletic group? - Paraphyletic because they are found in a wide array of habitats: wet soils, aquatic habitats, or the bodies of other organisms. - They are too diverse to classify How do protists feed, move and reproduce? - Protists eat in 3 different ways: 1. Ingestive a. Pseudopodia b. Filter/ Suspension 2. Absorptive a. Parasitic b. Decomposer 3. Photosynthetic Protists move towards light or prey: cell crawling, swimming with cilia/ flagella. How do protists go through alternation of generations? Is this different or similar to what we see in plants? - A spore divides by mitosis to form a haploid, multicellular gametophyte. The haploid gametes produced by the gametophyte then fuse to form a diploid zygote, which grows into the diploid, multicellular sporophyte. - Sporophytes produce spores by meiosis; gametophytes produce gametes by mitosis. - Much more complex life cycles than plants.
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Figures from chapter 29: 1, 5, 7 – 10, 13, 14, 18.
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Chapter 30 How has artificial selection played a role in agriculture? - By selecting individuals with the largest and most nutritious seeds, leaves, or other plant parts year after year, our ancestors gradually changed the characteristics of certain wild species. - Helped us maximize production as well as quantity and quality of best tasting (useful) resources possible What are some of the human uses of plants? -
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This note was uploaded on 04/22/2011 for the course LS 1 taught by Professor Thomas during the Fall '05 term at UCLA.

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Study Guide Midterm II - Chapter 29 What is the ecological...

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