Chapter12print - STAT503 Fall 2009 Lecture Notes: Chapter...

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Unformatted text preview: STAT503 Fall 2009 Lecture Notes: Chapter 12 1 Chapter 12: Linear Regression November 18, 2009 12.1 Introduction In linear regression, to explain values of a continuous response variable Y we use a continuous explanatory variable X . We will have pairs of observations of two numerical variables ( X,Y ): ( x 1 ,y 1 ) , ( x 2 ,y 2 ) ,..., ( x n ,y n ). Examples: X = concentration, Y = rate of reaction, X = weight, Y = height, X = total Homework score to date, Y = total score on Tests to date. They are represented by points on the scatterplot . STAT503 Fall 2009 Lecture Notes: Chapter 12 2 Two Contexts 1. Y is an observed variable and the values of X are specified by the experimenter. 2. Both X and Y are observed variables . If the experimenter controls one variable , it is usually labeled X and called the explanatory variable . The response variable is the Y . When X and Y are both only observed , the distinction between explanatory and response variables is somewhat arbitrary, but must be made as their roles are different in what follows. 12.2 The Fitted Regression Line Equation for the Fitted Regression Line This is the closest line to the points of the scatterplot. We consider Y a linear function of X plus a random error . We will first need some notation to describe the influence of X on Y : The following are as usual: SS x = n X i =1 ( x i- x ) 2 SS y = n X i =1 ( y i- y ) 2 s x = r SS x n- 1 s y = r SS y n- 1 One new quantity is the sum of products: r = 1 n- 1 n X i =1 x i- x s x y i- y s y = ( n i =1 x i y i )- n x y ( n- 1) s x s y . We consider a linear model : Y = + 1 X + random error . is called the intercept and 1 is called the slope . We only have a sample so we will estimate and 1 : We estimate 1 by b 1 = r s y s x We estimate by b = y- b 1 x . STAT503 Fall 2009 Lecture Notes: Chapter 12 3 The line y = b + b 1 x is the best straight line though the data. It is also known as the least-squares line. (Explanations will be given later.) We will call it the fitted regression line . Example: Let X be the total score on our Homeworks to date (in points) and Y be the total score on Tests (in points). The following summary statistics were obtained: n = 99 x = 546 . 76 y = 117 . 07 SS x = 990098 . 2 SS y = 62442 . 5 s x = 100 . 5 s y = 25 . 2 r = 0 . 8 We obtain b 1 = rs y /s x = . 2012 . and b = y- b 1 x = 117 . 07- . 2012 * 546 . 76 = 7 . 065 . Note: use many significant digits of b 1 to calculate b . The fitted regression line is Tests = 7 . 065 + 0 . 2012 * Homeworks . Here the plot for our data with predicteds and regression line: STAT503 Fall 2009 Lecture Notes: Chapter 12 4 [Discussion]How do we interpret slope and intercept in linear equations? Consider, e.g., F = 32 + 1 . 88 C , and the above equation.....
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This note was uploaded on 04/23/2011 for the course STAT 503 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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Chapter12print - STAT503 Fall 2009 Lecture Notes: Chapter...

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