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Lecture13 - PHYSICS 149 Lecture 13 Chapter 5 Circular...

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PHYSICS 149: Lecture 13 Chapter 5: Circular Motion – 5.1 Description of Uniform Circular Motion – 5.2 Radial Acceleration – 5.3 Banked and Unbanked Curve – 5.4 Circular Orbits of Satellites and Planets Lecture 13 Purdue University, Physics 149 1
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ILQ 1 When an elevator accelerates upwards, your When an elevator accelerates upwards, your apparent weight A) increases. B) stays the same. C) d C) decreases. Lecture 13 Purdue University, Physics 149 2
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ILQ 2 Amy and Bob release their snowballs from the same height and at the same time. Amy's is dropped while Bob‘s is thrown horizontally. Which one hits the ground first? A) the "dropped" snowball B) the "thrown" snowball C) they hit at the same time D) it depends on the initial height Lecture 13 Purdue University, Physics 149 3
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ILQ 3 A ball is thrown into the air and follows a parabolic trajectory Ignore air resistance At the highest trajectory. Ignore air resistance. At the highest point in the trajectory, A) the acceleration is zero, but the velocity is not zero. B) the velocity is zero, but the acceleration is not zero. C) both the velocity and the acceleration are zero. D) neither the acceleration nor the velocity are zero. x-component: constant velocity motion Lecture 13 Purdue University, Physics 149 4 y-component: constant acceleration motion
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Examples of Circular Motion Lecture 13 Purdue University, Physics 149 5
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Angular Variables The motion of objects moving in circular (or nearly circular) paths is often described by angles measured in circular) paths, is often described by angles measured in radians rather than degrees. The angle θ in radians, is defined as: The angle s r θ = If s = r the angle is 1 rad If s = 2 π r (the circumference of the circle) the angle is 2 π rad (In other words 360 ° = 2 π rad ) Lecture 13 Purdue University, Physics 149 6 rad. (In other words, 360 .)
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