week2-1 - How does a fall object behave? Before releaseing...

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Before releaseing the balls, decide what you think will happen. A. the heavier object will fall faster than the lighter one B. the lighter object will fall faster than the heavier one C. both objects will fall at about the same rate How does a fall object behave? Aristotle’s said (A) is correct.
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Looks like Aristotle is right, for over 1000 years, until Galileo did an experiment at the Leaning Tower of Pisa.
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Drop a Coin and a Feather before removing air Drop a Coin and a Feather After removing air
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Acceleration Due to Gravity Earth exerts a gravitational force on objects that is attractive (towards Earth’s surface). Near Earth’s surface, this force produces a constant acceleration downward. Galileo was the first to accurately measure this acceleration due to gravity . The feather fall slower in air because of the larger fiction with air. v = v 0 + at d = v 0 t + ½*at 2
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Flashes of a stroboscope illuminate a falling ball at equal time intervals. Distance covered in successive time intervals increases regularly. Since distance covered in equal time intervals is increasing, the velocity must be increasing.
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Average velocity for a time interval is given by dividing the distance traveled in that time interval by the time of the interval. For example, between the 2 nd and 3 rd flashes, the ball travels a distance of 4.8 cm - 1.2 cm = 3.6 cm in a time of 0.05 s : v 3.6 cm 0.05 s 72 cm/s
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The velocity values steadily increase. Time
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week2-1 - How does a fall object behave? Before releaseing...

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