week9-1 - Q15 Is it possible for a solid metal ball to...

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3/7/2011 Physics 214 Fall 2010 1 Q15 Is it possible for a solid metal ball to float in mercury? The upward force is the weight of liquid displaced and the downward force is the weight of the ball. If the density of the liquid is greater than that of the ball it will float. A). Yes. B). No.
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Temperature and Its Measurement When the physical properties are no longer changing, the objects are said to be in thermal equilibrium . Two or more objects in thermal equilibrium have the same temperature. If two objects are in contact with one another long enough, the two objects have the same temperature. This is the zeroth law of thermodynamics .
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The first widely used temperature scale was devised by Gabriel Fahrenheit. Another widely used scale was devised by Anders Celsius. The Celsius degree is larger than the Fahrenheit degree They are both equal at -40 . T C 5 9 T F 32 T F 9 5 T C 32
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The zero point on the Fahrenheit scale was based on the temperature of a mixture of salt and ice in a saturated salt solution. The zero point on the Celsius scale is the freezing point of water. Both scales go below zero. 0 F = -17.8 C Is there such a thing as absolute zero ?
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We can then plot the pressure of a gas as a function of the temperature. The curves for different gases or amounts are all straight lines. When these lines are extended backward to zero pressure, they all intersect at the same temperature, - 273.2 C . Since negative pressure has no meaning, this suggests that the temperature can never get lower than - 273.2 C , or 0 K (kelvin) . T
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This note was uploaded on 04/23/2011 for the course PHYS 214 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Purdue.

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week9-1 - Q15 Is it possible for a solid metal ball to...

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