week-10-3 - Charges and fields of a conductor In...

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Unformatted text preview: Charges and fields of a conductor In electrostatic equilibrium , free charges inside a conductor do not move. Thus, E = 0 everywhere in the interior of a conductor . Since E = 0 inside, there are no net charges anywhere in the interior. Net charges can only be on the surface(s). The electric field must be perpendicular to the surface just outside a conductor, since, otherwise, there would be currents flowing along the surface. Gausss Law: Qualitative Statement Form any closed surface around charges Count the number of electric field lines coming through the surface, those outward as positive and inward as negative. Then the net number of lines is proportional to the net charges enclosed in the surface . Uniformly charged conductor shell: Inside By symmetry, the electric field must only depend on r and is along a radial line everywhere. Apply Gausss law to the blue surface , we get E = 0 . The charge on the inner surface of the conductor must also be zero since E = 0 inside a conductor. E = 0 inside Discontinuity in E 5A-12 Gauss' Law: Charge Within a Conductor 5A-12 Gauss' Law: Charge Within a Conductor Electric Potential Energy and Electric Potential The electrostatic force is a conservative force, which means we can define an electrostatic potential energy. We can therefore define electric potential or voltage . Two parallel metal plates containing equal but opposite charges produce a uniform electric field between the plates. This arrangement is an example of a capacitor , a device to store charge. A positive test charge placed in the uniform electric field will experience an electrostatic force in the direction of the electric field. An external force F , equal in magnitude to the electrostatic force q E , will move the charge q a distance d in the uniform field....
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This note was uploaded on 04/23/2011 for the course PHYS 214 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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week-10-3 - Charges and fields of a conductor In...

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