week-13-2

week-13-2 - Examples of wave superposition When two waves...

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Examples of wave superposition
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When two waves are traveling in opposite directions , such as when a wave is reflected back on itself, the principle of superposition can be applied at different points on the string. At point A, the two waves cancel each other at all times. At this point, the string will not oscillate at all; this is called a node . At point B, both waves will be in phase at all times. The two waves always add, producing a displacement twice that of each wave by itself. This is called an antinode .
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This pattern of oscillation is called a standing wave . The waves traveling in opposite directions interfere in a way that produces a standing or fixed pattern. The distance between adjacent nodes or adjacent antinodes is half the wavelength of the original waves. At the nodes, it is not moving at all. At points between the nodes and antinodes, the amplitude has intermediate values.
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For a string fixed at both ends, the simplest standing wave, the fundamental or first harmonic , has nodes at both ends and an antinode in the middle. The second harmonic has a node at the midpoint of the string, and a wavelength equal to L . The third harmonic has four nodes (counting the ones at the ends) and three antinodes, and a wavelength equal to two-thirds L . f v v 2 L L v v f L v v f ) 3 / 2 (
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4/13/2011 Physics 214 Fall 2010 5 CHANGING TENSION OF THE STRING AFFECTS THE SPEED OF WAVE PROPAGATION AND CHANGES THE FUNDAMENTAL FREQUENCY THE BRIDGE ACTS AS A FRET THAT EFFECTIVELY CHANGES THE LENGTH OF THE WIRE AND THE FUNDAMENTAL FREQUENCY
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This note was uploaded on 04/23/2011 for the course PHYS 214 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Purdue.

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week-13-2 - Examples of wave superposition When two waves...

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