lec05 - Lecture 5 Planetary Motion Lecture 5 Purdue...

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Lecture 5 Planetary Motion Lecture 5 Purdue University, Astronomy 364 1
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Planetary Aspects Lecture 5 Purdue University, Astronomy 364 2 elongation: angle between a planet and the Sun
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Distance Measurement Lecture 5 Purdue University, Astronomy 364 3 For Mars, t = 107 days, so α β = 2 π P E 2 P Mars t = 2 1 365.256 1 686.98 × 107 = 0.862 rad = 49 d = 1 AU cos( ) = 1.52 AU
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Galileo’s Discoveries • The Moon has mountains and valleys. • The Milky Way is resolved into numerous stars. • Stars are points but the planets are disks. • The Jupiter has four satellites (Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto). – There are multiple centers of motion in the solar system. • The Venus appears smallest when it is full and largest when it is a thin crescent. – Incompatible with the Ptolemaic model. Lecture 5 Purdue University, Astronomy 364 4
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Lecture 5 Purdue University, Astronomy 364 5 heliocentric geocentric
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This note was uploaded on 04/23/2011 for the course ASTR 364 taught by Professor Cui,weik. during the Spring '11 term at Purdue.

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lec05 - Lecture 5 Planetary Motion Lecture 5 Purdue...

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