english paper

english paper - ReachingfortheUnreachable...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
“Reaching for the Unreachable” Toni Morrison's  The Bluest Eye Jason Lim 3/22/01
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The struggle for racial equality was still in full force in the 1940s. Toni Morrison's  The Bluest Eye  places the reader amidst the lives of ordinary African Americans in  Ohio. In the personal lives of African Americans, this inequality between blacks and  whites began to alter their perceptions of the “ideal” life. This “ideal” life included not  being black, that having a whiter skin color and doing things that white people did was  the epitome of goodness and happiness. Thus, blacks started to idolize their  counterparts, emulating their qualities as much as they could. Regardless of how much  blacks wanted to be white, they could never be viewed as equals to them. There are two  types of blacks: those who have yet to conform to the white culture, and those who  conformed and then suffered in some aspect of their lives.  Black children were the most influenced by this “ideal” life out of the black  population in the 1940s. Young girls like Pecola, Claudia, and Frieda grew up watching  famous white child superstars like Shirley Temple. When Frieda and Pecola fantasize  over the Shirley Temple silhouette on a milk cup, Claudia cannot understand their liking  of this white girl. Rather than adorning Shirley Temple, Claudia detests her and every  other white girl. She attributes this to her being younger than both of them, saying, “I  had not yet arrived at the turning point in the development of my psyche which would 
Background image of page 2
allow me to love her” (19). Morrison describes their influence to white culture as part of  their maturation process. Blacks start out hating their oppressors, yet there is a  psychological change that turns that hate into appreciation. This sudden change of  heart is something blacks have no control over; rather it is only a matter of time before  they do adorn white people. Blacks come to rationalize that their way of life is inferior,  and that the culture of the people who suppress them is the “ideal” way of living. As part  of their maturation, they become sick of their dark skin color and their habits, and even  use them as insults against their fellow black peers. Frieda and Claudia find Pecola  being subjected to this belittlement by black boys at their school. They surround Pecola,  insulting her with “Black e mo. Black e mo ya dadd sleeps nekked. Black e mo .
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/25/2011 for the course ENGL 260 taught by Professor Bardowell during the Spring '11 term at Saint Louis.

Page1 / 8

english paper - ReachingfortheUnreachable...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online