aristotle - knowledge were satisfied as it neither provides...

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Jason Lim November 5, 2009 Intro to Philosophy Essay #1 and #2 Summary In Essay #1 of Metaphysics , Aristotle defines knowledge and how one obtains it. Humanity by its nature, Aristotle says, desires knowledge. Knowledge is gained through the senses, primarily sight. That is not to say, however, that merely seeing things alone considers one to be knowledgeable. The senses merely give simple information about things. Aristotle uses fire as an example. Using one's senses, one can say that fire is hot, but the senses alone do not tell why fire is hot. In order for one to be knowledgeable, Aristotle says that one must know how things are as well as know why they are what they are. He holds master craftsmen in great esteem because they have knowledge of their craft, and are able to pass along what they know to others. Aristotle says that certain knowledge is not a necessity to life, but rather for recreation. People started philosophy when both recreational and practical
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Unformatted text preview: knowledge were satisfied as it neither provides pleasure nor proves to be a necessity of life. In Essay #2, Aristotle introduces wisdom, the science of all sciences. The wise man knows everything, and in order to know everything he must know the universals. If one has knowledge of universals, then he can make generalizations of individual things within the universals. Aristotle considers the sciences that deal with universals to be more “accurate” than those that deal with specific things. The origination of this science was not for practical purposes, but rather as a product of one's questioning of things. This hunt for knowledge did not begin until all the necessities of life were met. Aristotle considers this to be a divine science, since it deals with divine matters and only God would have these characteristics that philosophers try to study. Through studying philosophy, people become better human beings....
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