ethics RQ10 - necessity of an action done out of respect...

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Jason Lim Ethics Reading Questions #10 1. The only thing that Kant considers to be good without qualification is a good will. While certain character traits are desirable, they are only good if one has a good will to correctly influence their mind to use them in positive ways. 2. The first proposition of Kant's moral theory is that actions that are only done from the sense of duty have moral worth. If an action is done because it was motivated by inclination, then it has no moral worth. If a merchant overcharges someone then he is motivated by selfishness, not by duty. The second proposition is that moral worth of an action is derived from its maxim and not its end results. The moral worth of an action is evaluated by the principle of the will, for if one's will is good then he will choose the morally correct actions accordingly. The third proposition is that duty is the
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Unformatted text preview: necessity of an action done out of respect for the law. When one's duties are not influenced by inclinations, then all that is left is their will. Their good will objectively reveals the law for which duty must uphold. 3. The categorical imperative is that one ought to never act except in such a way that he can also will that his maxim should become a universal law. Kant needs the categorical imperative because this allows the will to serve as principle, and makes the sense of duty more concrete. 4. First formulation: Act according to the maxim that one wills to be a universal law. Second formulation: Act in such a way that one treats humanity, regardless of who it is, never as a means, but always as an end. Third formulation: Legislate universal law through the will of all rational beings....
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This note was uploaded on 04/25/2011 for the course PHIL 205 taught by Professor Jonathanreibsamen during the Spring '10 term at Saint Louis.

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