351expt2 - Experiment 2 Bioinorganic Coordination Chemistry:

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Experiment 2 Bioinorganic Coordination Chemistry: metalloporphyrins Perhaps the most important class of metal-containing compounds in biological systems is that comprised of complexes between metal ions and porphyrin ligands. Porphyrins are macrocylic tetrapyrrole systems with conjugated double bonds and various groups attached to the perimeter (see Figure 1). A porphyrin (PH 2 ) can lose two protons to become a 2- anion (P 2- ). It is the anionic form of the porphyrin that complexes with metal ions, usually in the +2 oxidation state, to form a metalloporphyrin complex (see Figure 1). A number of biologically important molecules such as hemoglobin and myoglobin contain iron porphyrin moieties (see Figure 2) . Figure 1. (A) A general reaction showing the Bronstead acid properties of a porphyrin. (B) A general reaction showing the formation of a metalloporphyrin. 15 A ) B )
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Protoheme IX, the prosthetic group for many important biologically important molecules. A group of compounds closely related to porphyrins are chlorins. The chlorin ring system shown in Figure 3a is a porphyrin in which the double bond in one of the pyrrole rings has been reduced. Chlorophyll is a magnesium complex of a chlorin. Chlorophyll a, shown in Figure 3b, is one of the molecules used to trap the energy of photons in the photosynthetic process. 16
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This note was uploaded on 04/22/2011 for the course ABC 101 taught by Professor Abc during the Fall '11 term at City University of Hong Kong.

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351expt2 - Experiment 2 Bioinorganic Coordination Chemistry:

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