Corporate_definition

Corporate_definition - Corporate finance Corporate finance...

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Corporate finance Corporate finance is an area of finance dealing with the financial decisions corporations make and the tools and analysis used to make these decisions. The primary goal of corporate finance is to enhance corporate value while reducing the firm's financial risks . Equivalently, the goal is to maximize the corporations' return to capital . Although it is in principle different from managerial finance which studies the financial decisions of all firms, rather than corporations alone, the main concepts in the study of corporate finance are applicable to the financial problems of all kinds of firms. The discipline can be divided into long-term and short-term decisions and techniques. Capital investment decisions are long-term choices about which projects receive investment, whether to finance that investment with equity or debt , and when or whether to pay dividends to shareholders . On the other hand, the short term decisions can be grouped under the heading " Working capital management ". This subject deals with the short-term balance of current assets and current liabilities ; the focus here is on managing cash, inventories , and short- term borrowing and lending (such as the terms on credit extended to customers). The terms Corporate finance and Corporate financier are also associated with investment banking . The typical role of an investment banker is to evaluate investment projects for a bank to make investment decisions. Capital investment decisions [1] Capital investment decisions are long-term corporate finance decisions relating to fixed assets and capital structure . Decisions are based on several inter-related criteria. Corporate management seeks to maximize the value of the firm by investing in projects which yield a positive net present value when valued using an appropriate discount rate. These projects must also be financed appropriately. If no such opportunities exist, maximizing shareholder value dictates that management return excess cash to shareholders. Capital investment decisions thus comprise an investment decision, a financing decision, and a dividend decision. The investment decision Management must allocate limited resources between competing opportunities ("projects") in a process known as capital budgeting . Making this capital allocation decision requires estimating the value of each opportunity or project: a function of the size, timing and predictability of future cash flows. Project valuation In general, each project's value will be estimated using a discounted cash flow (DCF) valuation, and the opportunity with the highest value, as measured by the
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resultant net present value (NPV) will be selected (see Fisher separation theorem ). This requires estimating the size and timing of all of the incremental cash flows resulting from the project. These future cash flows are then discounted to determine their present value (see Time value of money ). These present values are then summed, and this sum is the
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This note was uploaded on 04/25/2011 for the course FIN 421 taught by Professor Anupchowdhury during the Spring '11 term at BRAC University.

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Corporate_definition - Corporate finance Corporate finance...

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