Interview with a Teaching Professional

Interview with a Teaching Professional - Interview with a...

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Interview with a Teaching Professional Danny Hanshew Jr. AED/201 12/04/2010 Patty Smith
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After reading the interview responses, I have a new found appreciation for teachers. I now understand why sometimes they may complain about being glorified babysitters in a romper room. I interviewed Lynn Yarbrough; she is an elementary through secondary certified teacher for Florida with a special degree for Special Needs Children. The private school that she teaches in is for Special Needs Children only from Autism Spectrum Disorder to Behavioral Disorders. I interviewed her because this is the teaching field that I am pursuing. There are a multitude of complexities to handle when teaching in an environment such as she does. Not only does she have to address each need differently, but she has to truly relate or identify what will motivate each student individually and at the same time have group lessons. It also seems to me that she has to “pick her battles” when it comes which issues to address or not. Something as simple as a dress code violation, which to you and me would not be a big deal, but she has to address someone with a behavioral disorder, which might shut that student down for the day, or send them in to a tyrant. This will harm the class in two ways; one that students’ daily activities will be focused on the fact that the dress code is not proper, and now the whole class attention is focused on that instead of the lesson for that day. Trying to regain control and focus on a class is hard enough, but throw in the mix of disorders it becomes a juggling act that is almost impossible to keep going. The characteristics of the classroom are not the
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same in a Special Needs class as it would be in a Non-Special Needs class; it is intensified because of each situation individually. As a teacher she must deal with multidimensional issues each time a class starts, she has to assess the demeanor of each student as they come into the class. She had to see what type of “mood” they are in, did they have fight before class, did someone say something they took to heart, and did they work to long this weekend, so on and so forth. Then she must also at the same time tell which tasks she thinks she might get done today based on the reaction of the students as she greet them. Keeping the class going in a simultaneous fashion is important, for if the students lose focus it says that way too long. She must keep things happening at all times so while she is focused on one student addressing his issue she is having a different student either working on a project, or gives them a quick assignment until she can get back to the group activity. Things in a classroom happen almost immediately because you have a limited amount of time to get a lesson taught and understood, but in a Special
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Interview with a Teaching Professional - Interview with a...

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