9 Linear Momentum ay

9 Linear Momentum ay - Chapter 9 Linear Momentum and...

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1 Chapter 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions
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7 m 1 v 1 + m 2 v 2 = m 1 1 + m 2 2 p 1 + p 2 = 1 + 2 Law of Conservation of Momentum
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9 Railroad cars collide: momentum conserved. A 10,000-kg railroad car traveling at a speed of 24.0 m/s strikes an identical car at rest. If the cars lock together as a result of the collision, what is their common speed afterward?
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15 A nuclear collision. A proton of mass 1.01 u (unified atomic mass units) traveling with a speed 3.60 x 10 4 m/s has an elastic head-on collision with a helium nucleus ( m He = 4.00 u) initially at rest. What are the velocities of the proton and helium nucleus after the collision? (1 u =1.66 x 10 -27 kg.)
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16 9-6 Inelastic Collisions • Collision in which the kinetic energy is not conserved are called inelastic collisions. • Some of the initial kinetic energy in such collisions is transformed into other types of energy, such as thermal or potential energy. • The inverse can also happen when potential energy (such as chemical or nuclear) is released; the final kinetic energy can be greater. If two objects stick together after a collision, the collision is completely inelastic .
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19 Ballistic pendulum. The projectile, of mass m , is fired into a large block of mass M , which is suspended like a pendulum. (Usually mass M is somewhat greater than mass m .) As a result of the collision, the pendulum-projectile system swings up to a maximum height h . Determine the relationship between the initial horizontal speed of the projectile, v , and the height.
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This note was uploaded on 04/23/2011 for the course JAPAN 7b taught by Professor Wallace during the Spring '11 term at Berkeley.

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9 Linear Momentum ay - Chapter 9 Linear Momentum and...

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