Project_and_Feasibility_Paper_ChildhoodObesity-wk8-cutler (2)

Project_and_Feasibility_Paper_ChildhoodObesity-wk8-cutler (2)

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Project and Feasibility Paper Proposal Childhood Obesity By Amy Cutler Park University Spring 2-2008 EC315 Quantitative Research Methods Instructor: Brian Sloboda
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Purpose Statement 1. The dependent variable childhood obesity is determined by independent variables physical activity, dietary patterns, and family/environmental factors. Childhood obesity is a growing problem in America with many health and social consequences that often continue into adulthood. According to the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, the amount of overweight children aged 6 to 11 more than doubled in the past 20 years, it went from 7% in 1980 to 18.8% in 2004 (2007). The purpose of this project is to determine the effect of physical activity, dietary patterns, and family/environmental factors on children with the overall outcome of obesity. 2. The most important independent variable in this relationship is physical activity, because the leading cause of childhood obesity is physical activity; or the lack there of. Children are not getting the exercise that they need in order to burn the high-calorie foods that they consume. Insufficient calorie expenditure through exercise is due to an increase in television, video games, and the low number of safe playgrounds (Collins, 2007). Only about one-third of elementary children have daily physical education, and less than one-fifth have extracurricular physical activity programs at school (Ross & Pate, 1987). This variable was chosen because it directly determines the fate of an inactive adolescent. A child’s diet/nutritional intakes also a link in the grand chain of childhood obesity bearing impact on the lives of unsuspecting children. Model Equation 3. The model is: Y = X1 + X2 + X3 (CHILDHOOD OBESITY) = (PHYSICAL ACTIVITY) + (DIETARY PATTERNS) + (FAMILY/ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS)
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WHERE: Y = CHILDHOOD OBESITY X1=PHYSICAL ACTIVITY X2= DIETARY PATTERNS X3= FAMILY/ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS Dependent Variable 4. Y: The dependent variable is childhood obesity. The variable is defined in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) survey of many of the schools separated by state. This variable is defined by many questions surveyed of students as percentages according to the independent variables. X1: The primary independent variable is physical activity. This variable is defined as the percentage of students that did not meet recommended levels of physical activity at least five times a week. This variable has a great deal of effect on childhood obesity because if exercise is not used, caloric intake creates a determination of weight gain; continuous practice increases chances of obesity. This should show a positive relationship with the independent variable’s coefficient. X2: Another contributing factor is to childhood obesity is dietary patterns.
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This note was uploaded on 04/23/2011 for the course EC 315 taught by Professor Snyman during the Spring '11 term at Catholic Central High School, Lethbridge.

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Project_and_Feasibility_Paper_ChildhoodObesity-wk8-cutler (2)

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