{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

27Purg22to26W11 - BODY AND SOUL PEOPLE AND POETRY 1...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
B ODY AND S OUL : P EOPLE AND P OETRY Purgatorio 22-26 1
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
C ANTOS 22-23: G LUTTONY the upside down tree (22.131-138) Voices in the tree “You shall not eat this food” (22.141) Of the tree of knowledge thou shalt not eat (Gen 2.17) Mary’s mouth (22.142) Mary thought more about how the wedding could be made honorable and complete than about her mouth, which now answers for you. The ancient Roman women were content with water for their drink (22.145-6) Daniel scorned food but acquired knowledge (22.146-7) The Golden Age of the pagans (Ovid’s Metamorphoses ) 22.148-150 Simplicity John of Baptist 22.151-154 2
Image of page 2
C ANTOS 22-23: G LUTTONY the upside down tree 22.131-138 Mary’s mouth 22.144 Bocca : intersection of body & soul Labia mea, Domine 23.11 Part of the Miserere (Psalm 50): “O Lord, open my lips, and my mouth shall proclaim your praise” Speech that gives birth to delight and pain Tal che diletto e doglia parturìe (23.12) 3
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
T HE FACE OF DEATH Each was dark and hollow about the eyes, with faces pallid and so wasted that the skin took its shape from the bones (23.22-24) I do not think that Erysichthon was so dried up into his outer rind by fasting (23.25-27) 4
Image of page 4
E RYSICHTHON : SELF - EATING At last, when the strength of the plague had consumed all these provisions, and but added to his fatal malady, the wretched man began to tear his own flesh with his greedy teeth and, by consuming his own body, fed himself Ovid, Metamorphoses VIII.875-78 5
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
M ARY -- WHO ? Behold the people who lost Jerusalem, when Mary put her beak into her son. ( Purgatorio 23.29-30) Mary thought more about how the wedding could be made honorable and complete than about her own mouth, which now answers for you (22.142-3) 6
Image of page 6
C ANNIBALISM “Mary put her beak in her son” 23.30 A certain noble and wealthy woman named Mary […] Hunger and anger -- poor advisers indeed -- drove her to sin against nature itself […]. ‘Come my son, be food for your mother. […] When she had said this, she strangled the child and with her teeth bit into this body and put it aside. The soldiers, excited by the odor of meat, threatened her with death unless she gave them some of the food they had smelled. […] 7
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
C ANNIBALISM “Mary put her beak in her son” 23.30 […] Depraved as they were, they were horrified at the sight, nor could they utter a word, silenced by natural pity. She, with a look on her face far crueler than any murderer, said to them: “He is my son, the fruit of my womb, my sin; come, eat some of him, for I have already eaten, I who gave birth to him. Surely you are not going to be more merciful than a mother, softer than a woman! During the siege of Jerusalem under Titus. Source: Commentator on Dante, Benvenuto da Imola, drawing from Flavius Josephus The Jewish War 6.201-3.
Image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern