Excerpt from Coetzee Speech

Excerpt from Coetzee Speech - Excerpt from J.M. Coetzees...

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Excerpt from J.M. Coetzee’s speech upon receiving the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2003 “He and His Man” Boston, on the coast of Lincolnshire, is a handsome town, writes his man. The tallest church steeple in all of England is to be found there; sea-pilots use it to navigate by. Around Boston is fen country. Bitterns abound, ominous birds who give a heavy, groaning call loud enough to be heard two miles away, like the report of a gun. The fens are home to many other kinds of birds too, writes his man, duck and mallard, teal and widgeon, to capture which the men of the fens, the fen-men, raise tame ducks, which they call decoy ducks or duckoys. Fens are tracts of wetland. There are tracts of wetland all over Europe, all over the world, but they are not named fens, fen is an English word, it will not migrate. These Lincolnshire duckoys, writes his man, are bred up in decoy ponds, and kept tame by being fed by hand. Then when the season comes they are sent abroad to Holland and Germany. In Holland
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This note was uploaded on 04/25/2011 for the course ENG 3 taught by Professor Zane during the Spring '08 term at UC Davis.

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