RACISM

RACISM - Toor 1 The Steps to Overcome Anmol Toor Writing 2...

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The Steps to Overcome Anmol Toor Writing 2 Sarah Harris November 4, 2010 Toor 1
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One of the world’s most sensitive and controversial topics is racism. People avoid the topic fearing that their choice of words on it will make them seem prejudice. Thus, people who do input their opinions may accidentally create conflict through confusion by a slight slip of their tone or word choice: sensitive people may then believe they are being oppressed. It is the oppressors of the world that contribute to these everyday issues of racism. Therefore, there must be effective tactics for the oppressed and non-oppressors to fight the actions and words of the oppressors. After reading articles from Albert Memmi, Martin Luther King Jr., and Nelson Mandela, I found there to be three strong advances for diminishing oppression. The oppressed must first truly believe they are equal to the oppressors. Then they must use non-violent techniques to fight and eliminate racist stereotypes, and ideas. Finally, the oppressed must create organizations to project their assertions; the bigger the organization, the louder the case will be heard. In Albert Memmi’s article “Racism and Oppression”, a valid point is made. Memmi (2005) declares, “the oppressed man must cease to be oppressed” (p. 186). This is an important first step because the oppressed victim needs to gather up the courage and confidence to no longer feel degraded. The feeling of equality will give the oppressed the mental power to combat the oppressor. If the victim cannot acquire the confidence inside of himself or herself, then the determination to prove the oppressor wrong will be absent. In his letter, “Letter from Birmingham Jail”, Martin Luther King Jr. (2005) alleges, “freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed” (p. 217). This amplifies the statement from Memmi and shows how 2
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important it is for the oppressed to find the confidence within themselves to be equal to the oppressor. A similar personal experience of mine reflects the idea of the oppressed victim no longer being oppressed. When I was in the eighth grade, two white male students began to make fun of me because I was Indian. They mocked the accent of The Simpsons character Apu and obnoxiously spoke like him whenever they were around me. Inside, I became irritated by the sounds they made everyday, so one day I told them that the way
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This note was uploaded on 04/25/2011 for the course WRIT 2 taught by Professor Gahan during the Spring '08 term at UCSB.

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RACISM - Toor 1 The Steps to Overcome Anmol Toor Writing 2...

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