EE2002_Lab_Manual

EE2002_Lab_Manual - University of Minnesota Department of...

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Unformatted text preview: University of Minnesota Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering EE 2002 Laboratory Manual An Introductory Circuits/Electronics Laboratory Course 2 Introduction You will find this laboratory to be different than those you have experienced up to this time. It was designed with several objectives in mind. First, it is intended to supplement the lecture course EE2001 and can only be carried out with the maximum benefit if you are acquainted with the topics being discussed there. Second, it is intended to develop your self-confidence in laboratory procedures and in drawing conclusions from observations. As a consequence the instructions are very spare and assume you will be able to extract conclusions from each experiment and will relate parts of the total lab to each other without being explicitly asked to do so. Important Points - Your grade in this course will depend principally on your in-lab work. - You are expected to maintain a lab notebook. It must contain a running account of the experiment. It is not intended to be a book into which you copy notes previously gathered on the back of an envelope. It must however be legible and coherent. Write in such a way that another person could perform the same experiment based on your account, and this same person could understand the conclusions that you drew from your data. It is not necessary to hide your mistakes. If you make a mistake in an entry simply draw a line through that entry and start over - you will not be penalized for this. - The lab notebook should have the following characteristics: - It should be a bound notebook (spiral bound is OK). - Lab entries should be dated, and should include:- Complete circuit diagrams. - Explanation of circuit, methods, procedures, etc. - All calculations for designs. - All measurements (including component values). - All analysis and comparisons of data with theory. - Homework - There is no formal lab homework or pre-lab work in this course, but it will pay great dividends for you to make a careful reading of the experiment description before arriving in the laboratory. You will also note that some parts of the "experiments" involve analytical work which can be better done elsewhere. Most problems students have with this course are due to lack of preparation prior to coming to lab . If after reading through the lab and consulting the relevant section of your EE2001 text you do not understand something, seek out either your TA or the faculty member in charge of the lab. - If you do not spend at least 30 to 40 minutes studying the experiment, making notes, circuit diagrams, calculations, etc. in your laboratory notebook, prior to coming into the lab, you will not finish the experiments. It will be obvious to everyone in the class, including your 3 classmates, your Teaching Assistant, and your professor, that you have come in unprepared....
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This note was uploaded on 04/25/2011 for the course ELEC 2002 taught by Professor Tedking during the Spring '11 term at Minnesota.

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EE2002_Lab_Manual - University of Minnesota Department of...

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