Lecture 24

Lecture 24 - Lecture 24 Cannabis Neurobiology Key Concepts...

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Lecture 24 – Cannabis Neurobiology Key Concepts medicinal use of cannabis (Reefer Madness 2 film) cannabinoid receptors (CB1, CB2) synthetic cannabinoid compounds (WIN 55-212-2, a full CB1 agonist shown to be administered IV in rats, Fattore et al., 2001, 2007) THC – partial agonist at CB1 and CB2 receptors endocannabinoids (anandamide, 2-AG)
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Advanced Studies in Addiction PSYT 515 INSTUCTORS: , Psychiatry Department CONTENT: 3-credit seminar course. Critical discussion of phenomenology, aetiology, neurobiology and clinical perspectives on alcohol/drug addiction, with an emphasis on multi-factorial and inter-disciplinary approaches PARTICIPANTS: Graduate students in Psychiatry, Neurosciences, Psychology and Pharmacology; Undergraduates with appropriate prerequisites + permission of instructors PREREQUISITES: PSYT 301 or PHAR 300 or PSYC 318
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Currently available cannabinoid products in Canada 1. Sativex ® (GW Pharmaceuticals): herbal cannabis extract of 9 -THC and cannabidiol oromucosal spray (i.e., mouth) for neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis since December 2004 2. Cesamet ® /nabilone (Valeant Canada Limited): synthetic derivative of 9 -THC pill form reducing nausea and vomiting brought on by chemotherapy since 1981 3. Marinol ® /dronabinol (Solvay Pharmaceuticals): synthetic 9 -THC pill form nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy: since 1991 AIDS-associated anorexia/AIDS wasting): since April 2000 4. Herbal cannabis (two big advantages: rapid onset of action; easier to titrate)
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4 Neuromodulation by Cannabinoids CBs, such as CESAMET™ (nabilone), act on presynaptic CB1 receptors Inhibits the release of excitatory (e.g., glutamate) and inhibitory (e.g., GABA) neurotransmitters The primary effect on neuronal signaling appears to be inhibitory, but network effects may be complex and, hence, modulatory in nature
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Cannabinoid Receptors THC receptor localized in brain tissue by Herkenham in
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Lecture 24 - Lecture 24 Cannabis Neurobiology Key Concepts...

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