Lecture 17

Lecture 17 - Lecture 17- Abuse Liability and Neurobiology...

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Lecture 17- Abuse Liability and Neurobiology of Nicotine Key Concepts Health consequences of tobacco use Biphasic physiological and neurochemical effects of nicotine in the CNS and PNS Abuse liability of nicotine (Henningfield studies with IV self-administration in humans) Mecamylamine Neuronal nicotinic receptors (subunit composition) Effects of nicotine on dopamine release (and behaviour)
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Health Consequences of Smoking
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Health Consequences of Tobacco Use Cardiovascular disease Arteriosclerosis Coronary heart disease and stroke Respiratory diseases (COPD) Chronic bronchitis Emphysema Cancer (lung, larynx, mouth, bladder)
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Note the direct effects of nicotine on the heart, versus those caused by smoking per se (e.g. increased CO levels, free fatty acids)
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Smoking Rates and Lung Cancer Deaths Smoking rates dropping steadily. In 1994, 29% of Canadians aged 12 and over were current smokers. By 2003 23% current (18% daily) highest risk group, male and female young adults aged 20-24 (33.2%) lung cancer deaths are still the leading cause of cancer death Canadian Cancer Society estimates >300 die per week from lung cancer related to smoking. 19,000 Canadians died from lung cancer in 2004
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Trends In Cancer-related Death Rates in The U.S.
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Given the large number of compounds in cigarettes, how do we know that nicotine is the active addictive agent? Controversial some debate whether nicotine is the primary compound responsible, also suggesting that non- pharmacological factors are involved
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The abuse liability of nicotine – Henningfield, 1984
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E-cigarette http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PyvljpbiVb w
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PyvljpbiVbw http://www.smokeinstead.ca/
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Support for the reinforcing properties of nicotine nicotine is self-administered in humans and animals (e.g. Henningfield) nicotine cigarettes are preferred, intake is
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Lecture 17 - Lecture 17- Abuse Liability and Neurobiology...

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