Lecture 11

Lecture 11 - Lecture 11 - Neurobiology of Psychostimulants...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 11 - Neurobiology of Psychostimulants Key Concepts animal models used to study the neurobiology of stimulants (intravenous self-administration and conditioned place preference) CNS sites of action - role of dopamine (evidence from animal studies for role of dopamine in stimulant self-administration) pimozide, 6-OHDA, 7-OHDPAT, quinpirole dopamine transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporter (Vmat) Video Clips clinical assessment material http://webcampus.drexelmed.edu/nida/mod ule_1/default.htm Each side of the box has different cues (e.g., visual, olfactory, textural stimuli) that are paired with drug or placebo injections. After several days of conditioning, animals are given access to both sides of the box, and the amount of time spent on the drug-paired side is measured. Note that drugs are experimenter administered. Conditioned Place Preference IV Self-Administration IV Self-administration The Neurochemical Effects of Stimulants Animal Studies Using the IVSA paradigm - what studies would you design in order to determine the neurotransmitter or brain systems primarily involved in stimulant self-administration? Evidence Supporting Role for Catecholamines in the CNS Actions of Stimulants 1. Studies with synthesis inhibitors (alpha-methyl-para- tyrosine)...
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This note was uploaded on 04/26/2011 for the course PSYT 301 taught by Professor Kathryngill during the Winter '11 term at McGill.

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Lecture 11 - Lecture 11 - Neurobiology of Psychostimulants...

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