Hispanic Groups - Running head HISPANIC GROUPS 1 Hispanic...

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Running head: HISPANIC GROUPS 1 Hispanic groups Sarah Calame Eth 125 April 4, 2011 Nancy Messer
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HISPANIC GROUPS 2 Hispanic groups This is a brief summary of the linguistic, social, economic, religious, and familial status of Mexican American, Puerto Rican American, Cuban American, and Dominican American ethnic groups. Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican Americans all have very much in common, yet remain separate ethnic groups, descended from various ancestors. Many come to the United States for political asylum while others are looking to escape poor social or economic conditions. By the year 2050, almost one quarter of the population is estimated to be Hispanic. Nearly half of the Hispanic population in this country lives in California or Texas. (United States Census Bureau, 2011) Spanish is the primary language of Mexican Americans; more than 90 percent of U.S. Mexicans are literate. There is an element of formality in Mexican interactions especially when older persons are involved. Mexicans emphasize on familism, the nuclear family is the most common social unit. There is usually a strong reliance on family in day to day functions and crises. Value systems revolve around pride in family, and respect for the deceased as celebrated every November 1 st on El Dia des los Muertas, or the day of the dead. The primary religion practiced by this group is Roman Catholicism, the nominal religion of about 90 percent of Mexican Americans, although other faiths including Protestant do have some Mexican American followers as well. (Sanchez, 1993) As far as business and political arenas Mexican Americans tend to be underrepresented despite their large numbers. This lack of representation is largely due to a lack of higher education. The difference in wages between degree holders and high school graduates is significant, and accounts for the reduced buying power and national prominence of this group. Throughout the history of immigration to America, Mexicans seem to
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HISPANIC GROUPS 3 have made little progress in moving up from immigrant status to mainstream social status, partly due to the amount of discrimination and poor educational systems provided to them. Puerto Ricans are the third largest Hispanic subgroup living in the continental United States. A large population of Puerto Ricans settled in the states of Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, and New York. Puerto Ricans have been migrating to the United States for decades to seek
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