Essay 4 - On The Consequences of Our Wager Blaise Pascal...

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On The Consequences of Our Wager Blaise Pascal offers a reason for belief in God in his work entitled “The Wager.” While this argument is valid, it appears weak as an attempt to persuade nonbelievers because it leaves a few questions about the nature of God unexplored. Getting to the heart of the argument, one of Pascal’s first premises is that God either exists or He does not. This makes sense and cannot reasonably be denied by anybody. So, in this premise, Pascal rejects Agnosticism, the position that we cannot know whether God exists or not, and he says that a person can either reject or accept the existence of God. I agree with him on this point, because, in my experience, anything that I can think of either exists or it does not, and I am unaware of any other state of being in between. Then, Pascal introduces a game in which we must make a wager either for or against the existence of God. In other words, we either choose to believe in God or not believe in Him. He stipulates that we are bound to make a decision; the only problem with this requirement in the analogy is that people are not obligated to make a decision in real life, thus explaining the existence of Agnosticism. However, that fault in the analogy is forgivable because it serves as a starting point for his argument and it is a hypothetical situation. However, Pascal’s next
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This note was uploaded on 04/26/2011 for the course PHIL 089H taught by Professor Daniels during the Spring '11 term at UNC.

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Essay 4 - On The Consequences of Our Wager Blaise Pascal...

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